Arctic Birds Turn Up Two Years After Fukushima, Eastern Japan Can Breathe a Sigh of Relief

What can’t be seen from above is that nature is apparently thriving around Fukushima. A nesting pair of seabirds, unidentified but thought to be an ostrich species, caused a stir earlier this month when…

Arctic Birds Turn Up Two Years After Fukushima, Eastern Japan Can Breathe a Sigh of Relief

What can’t be seen from above is that nature is apparently thriving around Fukushima.

A nesting pair of seabirds, unidentified but thought to be an ostrich species, caused a stir earlier this month when they were spotted in the same area two years after the 2011 disaster, according to the East Japan Forum for Business & Economy.

The seabirds – which regularly nest on beaches near the site – typically settle on the roofs of buildings in the area and ride out the storm with a fast food restaurant.

A flat-scrub jay on the other hand, is said to show a 70 percent increase in numbers across Fukushima.

The big fish are also reported to be plentiful, ranging from skipjack tuna to yellowfin tuna to Pacifics. Fish stocks in the western Okinawan Strait are showing signs of improvement, including flounder and bluefin tuna.

Earlier this week, The Independent reported an increase in fish catches, as well as the wind rushing from the islands toward Fukushima, offering a boatload of eelwood out at sea.

Also, the report says a group of local fishermen spotted a whale carcass washed up on a beach in the area in December.

It was the first whale that had been found along the coast in 18 months.

Leave a Comment