Britvic returns to the playground of innovation

Scheme returns to production Britvic scientists have made great strides in the management of yeast, but many long-term problems remain. They believe COVID-19 is a milestone in its development, which will open a new…

Britvic returns to the playground of innovation

Scheme returns to production

Britvic scientists have made great strides in the management of yeast, but many long-term problems remain. They believe COVID-19 is a milestone in its development, which will open a new era for the company. Britvic Managing Director Terry Jones said: “For me this is a world first. I think it is going to be a game changer and it will introduce a lot of innovation. COVID-19 is being reintroduced in bulk-made soft drinks made using the company’s carbonation system. This redesign, which uses the same CO2 technology but in a different setting, sets the tone for the future.

The ‘golden 50’ top directors MELBOURNE, Australia: The world’s oldest new company started trading in the 1850s and has produced the quintessential beer. In February, Estrella Baja, in the state of Puebla, Mexico, announced its first three beers – canaca beer, puro beer and “best beer” ale. They are made using the famous “golden 50” technique, in which a second beer is produced at the end of fermentation. Estrella Baja CEO Jorge Hernandez Fernandez said: “Its uniqueness is that it is the only brewery in the world using a technique that has existed for over 100 years.” THINK LIKE A BRITISH CEO: CLICK HERE Britvic was set up in 1962 by Dannie Atherton and Julian Castle. It started as a soft drinks business supplying shops and independent bottlers throughout London. Since then, it has gone on to be a major player in the soft drinks industry, growing by 24 per cent each year.

Dannie Atherton “Over the years, we have developed a production line which allows us to make larger quantities of what we believe our best product is – soft drinks,” Mr Castle said. “Unfortunately, despite our investment and development, the means of production have not kept pace with our consumption of soft drinks, resulting in inadequate production facilities. “Therefore, in order to develop and improve our business for the future, in September 2010, we announced plans to make a further significant investment in new production facilities, which we expect to open towards the end of next year.”

Experts say the plan is to improve its facilities by having one centralised production facility at Grimsby, in East Yorkshire. The facilities at Enfield and Cambuslang currently make soft drinks such as Fuze Tea, Robinsons and Fixit. Overall, Britvic has nearly six million people who order soft drinks through its website, which make it the UK’s largest supplier of takeaway ready-to-drink drinks. The radical plans have already been approved by Britvic’s shareholders, leaving few concerns that the controversial new plans will not be approved by regulators, in time for the opening of the new Grimsby plant.

Since the UK site in Enfield ceased operations in 2015, Britvic has been in the process of moving to the new Grimsby site. David Penman, former managing director of the company, said: “Fully devising and starting production of COVID-19 is a key milestone towards getting soft drinks back to our best. We have always said we should ensure the plant can ‘produce COVID-19 and a better soft drink’ and that’s what we are doing.

“And by having one production site and leveraging real production cost savings from doing so, we are delivering a model for the future and accelerating our recovery from the recent downturn.” The COVID-19 sugar water was developed by a group of scientists at the UK’s first industrial-scale laboratory for multi-disciplinary science.

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