Thousands of Everest climb records set as famed elderly climber Edmund Hillary tops himself in latest documentary

Everest’s most famous alpinist, Edmund Hillary, conquered the highest peak on Earth on May 29, 1953, landing at the top of the world’s tallest mountain at 28,350 feet above sea level with climber Peter…

Thousands of Everest climb records set as famed elderly climber Edmund Hillary tops himself in latest documentary

Everest’s most famous alpinist, Edmund Hillary, conquered the highest peak on Earth on May 29, 1953, landing at the top of the world’s tallest mountain at 28,350 feet above sea level with climber Peter Norman five days after Sherpa Tenzing Norgay first scaled the same peak.

Hillary also carved into the top spot for North America, beating out his great friend, Stu “Ski” Wood, who was an adventurous American who climbed Everest in 1980 on his 60th birthday and was the oldest person to reach the summit at the age of 70, according to “Everest Record Book: The World’s Highest Place.”

Hillary is now 93, the subject of an upcoming documentary in which he reveals that when he and fellow conqueror Tenzing first heard that a rope was hung across the water supply line, they thought an earthquake might have trapped the climbers and they were trapped as well.

New Zealand native Hillary also helped run a medical clinic at the top of the world, opening it with a New Zealand newspaper journalist for four years. He also built a house at Everest base camp where he passed the time by watching porn films.

“In medical emergencies on Everest, you reach them before they get to you,” Hillary says in the film. “It’s God’s heart being there for you rather than some unknown faceless entity.”

Famed helmsman, Sherpa Tenzing, with whom Hillary hiked to Everest base camp, says Hillary is “a beacon, and he’s the living legend of Everest” in the new film.

More than 4,200 people have died attempting to climb Everest since the first climber — Lord Kelvin from the Channel Islands — climbed the mountain on May 23, 1953. The rest died either of exhaustion or falling from the world’s highest peak. More than 20 million people from around the world have attempted to reach the top of the highest mountain in the world.

Previous attempts include the ill-fated Sealab Expedition of 1932 that ill-fated took three Nepalese Sherpas and a Danish climber’s life.

The BBC said in a recent article that the death rate on Everest goes up on the higher mountains of the Himalayas since climbing conditions became more difficult around 1958, when climbers who were on deck to climb were covered by snow. They pushed back from the higher base camp in the hope that safe ascent wouldn’t be possible. But, they were likely brought down to the lower base camp, making the ultimate ascent a scramble, the British broadcaster said.

A climbing calendar states that the worst month for climbers is April because that is considered dangerous.

Nepal’s Department of Tourism encourages climbers and trekkers to use proper transportation, such as backpacks that make access easy and “can carry equipment and food.”

Everest is 900 times higher than the Earth’s surface.

Fox News’ Nadia Paladini contributed to this report.

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